The Western Meadowlark adults have yellow underparts, with a black V on the breast, and white flanks which are streaked with black. Their upper parts are mostly brown, but also have black streaks. These birds have long pointed bills and their heads are striped with light brown and black.


Habitat and Distribution

Their breeding habitats are grasslands, prairies, pastures, and abandoned fields, all of which may be found from across western and central North America to northern Mexico. Western Meadowlarks are permanent residents throughout much of their range. Northern birds may migrate to the southern parts of their range; some birds also move east in the southern United States.


Feeding

These birds forage on the ground or in low to semi-low vegetation. They sometimes search for food by probing with their bills eating mainly insects, although they will devour seeds and berries.


Breeding

Western Meadowlark nests are situated on the ground, and are covered with a roof woven from grass. There may be more than one nesting female in a male's territory.


Calls and Songs

These birds have a flute-like warbled song. Their calls are described as watery or flute like.